Last year our chapter participated in the Empty Bowls Project, a fundraiser for Food Gatherers at the Ypsilanti New Tech High School at Ardis. Many of you participated with us by donating ingredients for a soup in a “stone soup” style. We are happy to be participating in the event again this year, and we need help putting together another delicious, nutrient-dense soup. We’ll be making a 15 quart pot of Beef Vegetable soup.

The 2nd Annual Ypsilanti New Tech Empty Bowls Event takes place on April 19 from 5:30-7pm at the school. We’ll be collecting food donations on Sunday, April 15 at a home in Ann Arbor near the Miller/Maple intersection. We need the following:

(O=ingredient is needed; X=ingredient has been supplied)

  • 8 quarts bone broth (frozen is great; beef, chicken, or turkey stock) X O O O O O O O
  • 4# grass-fed hamburger (size donation: 1 pound pkg) X O O O

Chopped vegetables:

  • 2 x 3 cups (total 6 cups) chopped onions X O
  • 2 heads garlic, roasted and mashed O
  • 2 x 2 cups (total 4 cups) carrots, chopped X X
  • 2 x 2 cups (total 4 cups) celery, chopped X X
  • 4 cups green beans O
  • 10 oz green peas, frozen O
  • 2 x 2 cups zucchini, in circle quarters O O
  • 1 head cabbage, sliced thinly O

Please contact Jessica at info@aawapf.org or (810) 225-2789 if you are able to help and let us know what you will be able to provide.

And remember that even a quart of broth or a pound of vegetables is more than helpful if, as a community, we can all give a little.

Most of us know someone affected by the downturn of our economy. Some have lost jobs, some have lost homes, and some can’t feed their families.

Thankfully some are coming together to help their neighbors.

One such project is the Empty Bowls Project. At a recent AAWAPF forum it was brought to our attention that Ypsilanti New Tech High School at Ardis is putting on an Empty Bowls event to raise money for Food Gatherers. It was also brought to our attention that the soup served to children and their families at this event could easily be the very foods that we take care to avoid feeding our own families every day.

Fortunately, we have been given the opportunity to help. We would like to pull together as a local community to not only nourish children and their families with a nutrient-dense soup for this event, but also to introduce people to traditional foods possibly for the first time.

We are looking for donations of food to make a 20 quart pot of soup including bone broth, grass-fed hamburger, and plenty of good vegetables. We are also looking for those who might spare some time to help pull together in the spirit of “stone soup” to lovingly prepare the meal.

We would like to coordinate ingredients and effort so that we can be sure that every need is met and therefore every mouth is fed.

We need the following:

(O=ingredient is needed; X=ingredient has been supplied)

  • 10 quarts bone broth (frozen is great; beef, chicken, or turkey stock) X X X X X X O O O O
  • 5# grass-fed hamburger (size donation: 1 pound pkg) X X X X X

Chopped vegetables:

  • 8 cups chopped onions X
  • 3 heads garlic, roasted and mashed X
  • 2 x 3 cups (total 6 cups) carrots, chopped X X
  • 2 x 3 cups (total 6 cups) celery, chopped X X
  • 6 cups green beans X
  • 12 oz green peas, frozen X
  • 2 x 3 cups zucchini, in circle quarters X O
  • 2 heads cabbage, sliced thinly X X
  • 6 cups whole tomatoes X

We will need all ingredients by Sunday, April 24 in order to prepare the soup on time. Please contact Jessica at info@aawapf.org or (810) 225-2789 if you are able to help and let us know what you will be able to provide.

And remember that even a quart of broth or a pound of vegetables is more than helpful if, as a community, we can all give a little.

Thank you.

Jeff, David, and Mark interview Frances Farmer about Dr. Weston A. Price, a UM grad who studied healthy traditional people. We learn about how the microflora in our guts are an integral part of our lifeforms, that we should eat lacto-fermented foods and properly sourced/prepared saturated fat, and more about a diet of sacred foods.

Dear Ann Arbor WAPF friends,

Vote for raw milk (see http://www.realmilk.com/ for more information) and against NAIS (see http://libertyark.org/ and http://farmandranchfreedom.org/ for more information)! See the note below for instructions. This is an easy and possibly effective way to raise awareness about these two very important issues related to our access to healthy food.

TAKE ACTION

Step 1: If you are not already signed up for the site, register at:
 https://www.change.org/admin/sign_up 

Step 2: Go to http://www.change.org/ideas/view/stop_nais to vote to stop NAIS.
Be sure to click the box labeled "vote!" to the left of "Protect Our Food Supply -- Stop NAIS!"    

Leaving a comment does not count as a vote.
After you vote, the "vote" box should change color and read "voted."  
If it doesn't, then wait a moment, shift your mouse slightly, and click again until your vote registers.

Step 3: Go to http://www.change.org/ideas/view/legalize_milk to vote for raw milk. 
Be sure to click the box labeled "vote!" to the left of "Legalize Milk."  
Leaving a comment does not count as a vote.

Step 4: Email all your friends, and ask them to vote also.

You can vote for up to 10 ideas.  
But remember that all of the ideas are competing against each other to be in the Top 10, 
and that only the Top 10 will be publicized at the National Press Club event.

One of the ideas currently in the Top 10 is Health Freedom, 
which covers a wide range of issues and briefly mentions both raw milk and microchipping.  
You can vote for it at http://www.change.org/ideas/view/health_freedom 

This is a very quick, easy way to help us raise awareness about raw milk and NAIS 
and potentially get significant new resources for this fight!  
Please go to http://www.change.org/ideas/view/stop_nais and http://www.change.org/ideas/view/legalize_milk to vote now!

In case you haven’t heard yet about the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund, or in case you have heard but haven’t acted yet, I wanted to draw everyone’s attention to this new and vitally important organization. Spearheaded by the Weston A. Price Foundation, the Fund was launched this past summer to support the consumer’s right to access local, real food and to protect small and medium-size farmers and ranchers from the increasing threats and harassment by misguided government entities. The FTCLDF will provide legal counsel to farmers and consumers and promote our interests to the government. Some of the topics they may be tackling in the future include GMOs, NAIS, and raw milk issues. The Fund was set up not a moment too soon, just in time to address several raw milk issues, including AB 1735 in California that threatens to disrupt fresh milk availability in the state that has, up until now, been a beacon of hope for fresh milk consumers everywhere.

You can support the FTCLDF by making a one-time donation or through an annual membership.

Unfortunately, our rights to choose clean local foods are being diminished and many small farms are facing legal threats. Who would have thought that we’d have to set up a legal defense fund just to obtain farm-fresh foods from farmers we know and trust? But I sure am glad that we now have the strength and wisdom of the FTCLDF. Let’s do what we can, and every little bit absolutely does help, to support this organization so that they can, in turn, help protect our basic rights.

I returned yesterday from the amazing Wise Traditions 2007 conference. It was a fantastic, whirlwind weekend featuring brilliant speakers, fascinating vendors, and, of course, delicious food. I was planning to blog the event while I was there, but the hotel charged quite a bit for wireless (Who even charges for wireless anymore?!) and I couldn’t bear to cough up the money. But I took copious notes and I’m so excited to share with you all the things I learned. I’ll write a few posts in the coming days about the conference, and I also hope we can get together soon so that those of us that went can share what we learned.

A highlight for me was, of course, seeing the brilliant and inspiring Sally Fallon. She taught some excellent “Making It Practical” classes where she shared really useful tips and menus for applying the Nourishing Traditions diet to your everyday meal planning. I’d love to be able to offer classes similar to these here at home. She also led the chapter leader meeting on Monday-more on that later. For now let me just say…WOW! WAPF chapters around the world are doing some amazing things, from raw milk political activism that is really making a difference, to writing textbooks for young adults and teaching materials for parents.

Another highlight for me was meeting Joel Salatin, the powerhouse farmer-cum-writer, activist, world-changer, and all-around really cool guy. He signed my copy of his book Everything I Want To Do Is Illegal and also gave a rousing, energetic, and very impressive closing address on Sunday evening.

And speaking of that, I’d like to get the audio recording of all the conference sessions for the chapter and then hold some get-togethers for those interested in hearing them. Check out the conference schedule here to see what you might be interested in.

Overall, I was incredibly awed and impressed by the high caliber of the speakers and the conference as a whole. It really expanded by understanding of the restorative power of nutrient-dense food. I was struck by the large number of beautiful, chubby, healthy babies present at the conference, reinforcing the imperativeness of reinstating a traditional, nutrient-dense diet in our families to improve our quality of life and ensure future healthy generations.